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tedx:

Hundreds of talks from independently organized TEDx events around the world are published on the TEDxTalks website weekly.

Each Tuesday, we’ll choose four of our favorites, highlighting just a few of the enlightening talks from TEDx community, and its diverse constellation of ideas worth…

beingblog:

The Bible as Thomas Jefferson Read Jesus’ Life

by Trent Gilliss, senior editor

The Jefferson BibleSix years before his death in 1826, Thomas Jefferson constructed a text for his own personal library, which he often read each night for 30 minutes to an hour before bedtime. The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth — commonly referred to as The Jefferson Bible — is a compendium of clippings from the four gospels of the New Testament. The former president and author of the Declaration of Independence cut passages from six texts composed in four languages — English, French, Greek, and Latin — and pasted them in separate columns, side by side, so that he could study and compare the different translations.

The 77-year-old Deist believed Jesus’ life and teachings to be “the most sublime and benevolent code of morals which has ever been offered to man.” But Jefferson was a product of the Enlightenment and was skeptical of the four authors of the Gospels. He intended to tell a chronological version of Jesus’ life, eliminating the passages that appeared “contrary to reason.” Title Page of The Jefferson Bible There’s no resurrection story at the closing of Jefferson’s Bible; the tomb is shut.

As outlined in the video above, Jefferson’s Bible has undergone a meticulous conservation process and is now being displayed through May 28, 2012 at the Albert Small Documents Gallery in the National Museum of American History in Washington D.C. If you can’t make the trip, or even if you can, be sure to check out the online exhibition, which provides high-quality, zoomable photographic images of each of the 84 pages of The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth. And they’re all transcribed too!

photojojo:

Canon’s new ELPH cameras come with Sleeping Face Recognition.

That means it detects when you’re photographing a sleeping person and automatically turns off its flash, detect beam (that red light), and beeping sound.

…so you can be extra sneaky!

Canon’s New ELPH Cameras Detect Sleeping People

via Engadget; photo by Desmorider (not shot on an ELPH)

mashable:

Brooklyn band A Place To Bury Strangers made a video for their new single “So Far Away” exclusively using Hipstamatic. According to Spin, who premiered the video, the photos were shot by band member Oliver Ackermann using the “Ina’s 1969 Film” filter only.

Have you seen any other music videos made like this? Tweet us @MashableHQ and let us know.

fastcompany:


DJ Patil pulls a two-foot-long metal bar from his backpack. The contraption, which he calls a double pendulum, is hinged in the middle, so it can fold in on itself. Another hinge on one end is attached to a clamp, which he secures to the edge of a table. “Now,” he says, holding the bar vertically, from the top, “see if you can predict where this end will go.” Then he releases it, and the bar begins to swing wildly, circling the spot where it is attached to the table, while also circling in on itself. There is no pattern, no way to predict where it will end up. While it spins and twists, with more velocity than I’d have imagined, Patil talks to me about chaos theory. “The important insight,” he notes, “is identifying when things are chaotic and when they’re not.”

 Generation Flux: DJ Patil

fastcompany:

DJ Patil pulls a two-foot-long metal bar from his backpack. The contraption, which he calls a double pendulum, is hinged in the middle, so it can fold in on itself. Another hinge on one end is attached to a clamp, which he secures to the edge of a table. “Now,” he says, holding the bar vertically, from the top, “see if you can predict where this end will go.” Then he releases it, and the bar begins to swing wildly, circling the spot where it is attached to the table, while also circling in on itself. There is no pattern, no way to predict where it will end up. While it spins and twists, with more velocity than I’d have imagined, Patil talks to me about chaos theory. “The important insight,” he notes, “is identifying when things are chaotic and when they’re not.”

Generation Flux: DJ Patil

bigringriding:

HIGH TIME WE HAD SOMETHING ON BARTALI. BUT SINCE LOUISON IS COMPREHENSIVELY TAKING HIM TO THE PAIN CAVE HERE, IT’LL HAVE TO WAIT.
via

bigringriding:

HIGH TIME WE HAD SOMETHING ON BARTALI. BUT SINCE LOUISON IS COMPREHENSIVELY TAKING HIM TO THE PAIN CAVE HERE, IT’LL HAVE TO WAIT.

via

thepoliticalnotebook:

Morning Reading: “Arab artists flourishing as uprisings embolden a generation” at The Guardian, from Tuesday.
Morning Viewing: A detail from Khaled Hafez’s installation “Tomb Sonata in Three Military Movements.” (Bonus: read an interview with the artist about the making and meaning of this piece.)

thepoliticalnotebook:

Morning Reading: Arab artists flourishing as uprisings embolden a generation” at The Guardian, from Tuesday.

Morning Viewing: A detail from Khaled Hafez’s installation “Tomb Sonata in Three Military Movements.” (Bonus: read an interview with the artist about the making and meaning of this piece.)

bijan:

Much has been written about apple’s proprietary approach to the textbook business.

I think the critics have a point.

But there are three important things that apple is worth talking about and applauding

1. They have created the most useful and most successful tablet ever. Microsoft has been…

jtotheizzoe:

Mind-Melter of the Day
It turns out that if you divide 1 by 998,001 you get all three-digit numbers from 000 to 999 in order.
Except for 998.
(via Futility Closet)

jtotheizzoe:

Mind-Melter of the Day

It turns out that if you divide 1 by 998,001 you get all three-digit numbers from 000 to 999 in order.

Except for 998.

(via Futility Closet)